Green Grow the Rushes

from by Madagán & Divya Naik

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about

Scottish Folk Song By Robert Burns.

'Green Grow The Rashes O' (also known as Green Grow the Rushes O) is one of Robert Burns's earliest songs, originally without the final verse.In this arrangement we include the final verse but omit one of the middle verses in order to maintain continuity with Divya's verses and the theme.

It was song number 77 in the Scots Musical Museum vol 1 (1787). The first two lines of the chorus are taken from a version in Herd's 'Scots Songs', ii, p. 224, 1776, a song entitled 'Green grows the Rashes'.
'Green Grow the Rashes O' was sung to a traditional Scottish tune, an early version of which appears in written record as "A dance. grein greus ye rasses" (A dance: green grow the rashes) as early as the early 17th century (Straloch Lute manuscript, 1627-29). By the time Burns wrote his piece, the modern form of the tune was established and appeared in collections of music as (The) Grant's Rant, John Black's Daughter, Lucky Black's Daughter, Foot's Vagaries, and Green Grows the Rashes, and Burns himself refers to "the merry old tune of that name" (Green Grows the Rashes).

The tune appears in William MacGibbon in Book 1 of Scots Tunes 1742 as 'Green Grows the Rashes' (to be played slow). Tunearch.org tells us that the tune was originally a rant but "in the transition the rant form was dropped and a strathspey rhythm was substituted, a not uncommon fate of rants [a rant typically has two sixteenth notes and an eighth note, usually occurring on the first beat of the bar - see the Gow and Stewart-Robertson versions]".

Source:https://www.scottish-country-dancing-dictionary.com/green-grow-the-rashes.html

Konkani lyrics:

This song is dedicated to womanhood. The creation of the lyrics was sudden and beautiful.
‌They signify the importance of a woman in a man's life.
‌Thus the lines say, in this world of no time and and only money, you cant live without her, she is the nectar, you are the king of her life and she is the queen.

lyrics

There's nought but care on every hand
in every hour that passes o
what signifies the worth o' man
If it was nae for the lasses o.

Chorus
Green grow the rushes o.
Green grow the rushes o.
The sweetest he that e'er i spent
I spent among the lasses o.

A wardly race may riches chase
and riches still may fly them o
And when at last they catch them fast
their hearts can not enjoy them o

so give me a cannie hour at e'en
my arms about my dearie o
and wordly cause and wordly men
can all go tapsalteerie o

Old nature swears, that lovely dear
The noblest work she classes, o
Her prentice hand she tried on man
And then she made the lasses, o

credits

from Madagoan, released November 6, 2019
Trad. Arr. Madagán & Divya Naik. Konkani lyrics by Divya Naik.

Clair McGreevy: Guitar, Vocals.
Divya Naik: Vocals.
Jason O'Rourke: Ab/Eb Concertina.
Stephen Porter: Whistle.
Maria Rafferty, Lead Vocals.

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Madagán Belfast, UK

Madagán take their name from Beann Mhadagáin , the iconic mountain that overlooks their home city of Belfast. Performing on concertina, uilleann pipes, whistles, guitar, flute and sumptuous harmony vocals, the music of this dynamic four-piece is driven by Belfast’s thriving music scene.

Divya Naik is one of Goa's most promising emerging artists. Kingfisher voice of Goa in 2015
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